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Attic Insulation Means a Cozy and Healthy Temperature at Home in Winter - Boston, Worcester, MA

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Now that autumn is here, this is the best time to insulate the attic. This is the part of your home from where most of the heat. High energy costs combined with cold or freezing weather means expensive heating. But with the right attic insulation, you can save money on your energy bills this winter. In fact, the money you can save from reduced energy bills can quickly pay for the cost of the attic insulation in Boston, MA.

While a heavy snowfall can be beautiful, it can also create a number of problems. Inadequate or incorrect attic insulation can lead to heat loss and ice dams during winter. If you are a homeowner in the Boston or Worcester area, properly insulating your attic has added benefits.

The majority of homes are inefficient. That is why you need a more efficient heating system for your house. This can help you maintain an appropriate ambient temperature inside. However, heating your home is not just about installing a heating system. It also means having the right insulation installed where it is needed. Attic insulation has been proven safe and effective to heat your home by keeping a comfortable and healthy temperature inside all year long. Insulation specialists know how to keep the warm air inside your home by properly installing insulation or upgrading your existing insulation.

Poor attic insulation can compromise you heating system’s performance. Get ready for the winter by contacting Custom Insulation.

Fiber Glass Blanket Insulation for Steel Buildings - Boston, MA

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Blanket insulation for steel buildings is the most popular type of insulation. It comes in the form of batts or rolls which consist of flexible fibers, usually fiberglass. If properly installed and maintained, this insulation will help buildings become highly durable, energy-efficient, and well-ventilated for longer.

In steel buildings, installing insulation controls heat flow, minimizes condensation buildup, reduces exterior noise level, and increases lighting efficiency. Installing the right kind of commercial insulation aids in controlling the conduction of outside temperatures. This way, steel buildings stay warmer when the temperature drops and cooler when the temperature rises. The options for steel building insulation are limited and three factors need to be addressed when considering which type of insulation to choose: condensation, cold, and radiant heat.

Batt and blanket fiberglass insulation is an excellent insulator specifically designed for use in steel buildings.

Facing is the part of the insulation which faces the inside of the building. In choosing batt and blanket fiberglass insulation, the facing material must be carefully selected, especially if it is going to be left exposed. They vary in three key qualities – durability, permeability, and workability. The durability of the facing, which determines how well it can stand up to physical stress, withstanding ripping and tearing. The permeability pertains to the rate of water vapor transmission as steel buildings need to have a good vapor barrier to resist moisture. Workability is measured based on the minimum temperature that is required for its installation.

The insulation capacity and quality of batt fiberglass insulation in Boston, MA is directly proportional to the thickness of the material. Since the power of insulation is measured relatively in R-values, the thicker the fiberglass, the higher the R-value, the more effective a layer of insulation is.

Today there are various options and technology available for insulation in steel building and other venues. Choosing the right type of installation is a must to achieve optimal results.

Spray Foam Insulation FAQ's

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Does spray foam insulation release any Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)?

Polyurethane foam is not considered to emit VOC's. After curing there should be no emissions. To be sure, check with your foam supplier.

Can it be used to insulate underground water pipes?

Yes! Regional climate changes will be a part of the decision making process. During application, no moisture can be allowed on or in the foam until it has cured.

Should fiberglass insulation be removed before applying spray foam insulation?

Yes! If left in, there will be a problem with ventilation and temperature control. More clearly, the temperature of the attic floor will be different than amidst the fiberglass and the temperature amidst the fiberglass will be different than above the spray foam. The job of the spray foam is to balance temperature and humidity with the environment so condensation is prevented.

Does the surface where it will be applied have to be clean?

Yes! Any oil or dust on the application surface will prevent the spray foam insulation from adhering. A careful vacuuming job covering every nook and cranny will often be adequate.
For applications where the surface is steel (or any other metal) it is even more important for the surface to be free of dust and oil.

Does an attic need to be vented if spray foam insulation on the rafters?

That depends. If you are applying the spray foam to the roof deck and gable walls, then you want everything under that surface to be a part of the temperature conditioned space. Vents in an attic with insulation above it would be a waste of money. If you are applying spray foam to just the attic floor, then the conditioned space is below the attic floor. Vents will be necessary for preventing excess humidity.

There are likely many more questions concerning spray foam insulation. For more insulation contact Custom Insulation.

Ezine Articles

Eco-Friendly Insulation Options

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, December 04, 2012

What are some eco-friendly options for insulating an unheated room of my home?

Enclosing a rarely used 3 season room is a great way to add year-round useable square footage to your home. Adding insulation lets you comfortably connect the room to the rest of your home. Foam installation is an effective solution because it's fire-resistant and provides a strong temperature barrier in tight spaces.

Knauf EcoBatt® Insulation doesn’t look like any insulation you’ve ever seen, but that’s because its natural brown color represents a level of sustainability we've never before achieved. EcoBatt Insulation combines sand, post-consumer recycled bottle glass and ECOSE Technology to create the next generation of sustainable insulation.

Another eco-friendly insulation option is cellulose insulation, which is a plant fiber that is typically made from recycled newspapers and contains 855 recycled content. Cellulose spray is considered one of the most environmentally-friendly insulation products available, and it effectively seals against air infiltration and blocks water vapor while containing no formaldehyde, asbestos, mineral fiber, or fiber glass. Cellulose also takes 10 times less energy to produce than fiberglass and does not support mold or fungus growth.

Eco-friendly insulation allows you to rest assured knowing your home is performing at its peak efficiency while becoming a healthier dwelling for you and your family. Consider all environmental aspects of foam and cellulose before investing in insulation.

For more information on eco-friendly insulation options, contact Custom Insulation.

Daily Camera

Insulate and Save

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, November 13, 2012

We may have had some warm weather over the weekend, but now winter is here to stay, which means it’s time to prepare your home for the cold. It may cost some time and money, but winterizing will be worth it in the long run.

If you can keep the heat in your house, it’s going to keep the money in your pocket.

According to the Department of Energy, winterizing can save homeowners as much as 25% on heating costs. In Worcester, it costs quite a bit to heat a house all winter, so 25% can really add up. Ensuring your home has the  proper insulation is well worth the time and money.

Checking attic and crawl spaces for adequate insulation is key. Most heat loss results from heat leaving your home out of the attic and roof.

For help insulating your home, contact Custom Insulation.

Excerpts WHOTV

Winterize Homes - Fall is the Best Time

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Now is the time to winterize your home and protect your home against freezing pipes.

It is important to make preparations to prevent water damage from frozen and burst pipes before temperatures plunge. The winter can pose many challenges to a homeowner, but one of the biggest and most costly is the risk of frozen pipes. Frozen pipes occur in areas of the home that are not insulated or that are poorly insulated. When ice expands inside pipes, it can crack and burst the pipe, leaving homeowners with a costly plumber bill, and thousands of dollars in damages from water leaking inside the house.

Winterizing is just as important in new homes as it is in older homes where insulation is often poorly done or not done correctly. Older home construction will sometimes include pipes in unprotected locations without insulation, including crawl spaces, and these can be particularly at risk.

Luckily, these problems are preventable by evaluating areas of vulnerability throughout the home. Implementing the following winterization tips now can help avoid headaches later:

  • Search your house for under insulated pipes or non-insulated pipes, especially in unheated areas. Consider wrapping pipes with electric heating tape, but follow manufacturers' instructions carefully to avoid a fire hazard.
  • Seal cracks and holes in outside walls and foundations, especially where cable TV or phone lines enter the house, with caulking to keep cold winds away from pipes
  • Consider wrapping your water heater in an insulation blanket. While not really at danger for freezing, this can lower your heating bills.

For information on better insulating your home, contact Custom Insulation.

Daily Finance

Air Duct Insulation Improves Home Heating Efficiency

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, September 18, 2012

The cooler weather is here, and in fact some of Massachusetts may have frost before the end of the week. It is almost time to turn on your heat. If you are starting to think about heating your home for the winter - HVAC tune-ups, ordering pellets, stacking wood - you may also want to think about insulating air ducts.
 
Adding insulation makes your home more energy efficient. Energy is usually wasted from your heating systems and as heat escapes from your home out of the attic. Well-maintained heating systems run more efficiently and waste less energy.

Ducts that move air to and from a forced air furnace or heat pump can waste energy. Sealing and insulating these ducts can improve the efficiency of your heating system by as much as 20%. Start with the attic and basement because these are areas where your ducts are often not insulated.

Sealing and insulating air ducts can improve their energy efficiency and keep warm air inside. Insulating your air ducts helps maintain the temperature of the air flowing through them and into your home.

Contact Custom Insulation to improve the air duct insulation in your home.

Testimonial to New Insulation

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 28, 2012

At Custom Insulation, this is some feedback we received from a customer who purchased a wood burning stove from us, and had their second floor bedroom ceiling insulation replaced.

“I have an antique home, and last winter we got ice dams. During the repair process, I the attic insulation replaced in my bedroom ceiling. The difference in the warmth of my home throughout the winter was very noticeable. I realize that this was a more mild winter, but cold is cold, and you still have to heat your home.

We use our wood burning stove primarily to heat our home, and with increased and better insulation in the second floor ceiling, the oil heat barely ever came on - all winter long.  The upstairs of our home used to be very cold throughout the winter and very hot throughout the summer. I can’t wait to see what happens this summer. I suspect that it will be so much cooler and enjoyable.
 
The difference in my oil heating bill was outrageous, in fact we have not used an entire tank! The difference was so great, that this spring I am going to have the rest of the upstairs and attic insulation replaced.”

Reduce Home Heat Loss

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, January 31, 2012

This winter may not have had a lot of snow so far, but the house still gets cold. A great way to increase your homes heating (can cooling) efficiency is to increase your home’s insulation. Adding additional insulation, especially in the attic, can make a huge difference in the temperature of your home all year round.

At the same time that you are checking your attic insulation, you should be sure that there is proper insulation around your pipes as well.
 
Typically, a home loses heat in the following areas: ceilings, walls, floors, windows and doors, and “infiltration (air loss).” Even though your home loses heat from all these areas, they don’t all lose the same amount of heat.
 
Here is how each area stacks up in terms of percent heat loss in a home:

  • Infiltration / Air Leakage: 35%
  • Windows and Doors: 18 – 20%
  • Floors and Below Grade Space: 15 – 18%
  • Walls: 12 – 14%
  • Ceilings: 10%

Contact Custom Insulation for your insulation needs.

Federal Energy Tax Credits About to Expire

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, November 15, 2011

If you have not taken advantage of the energy tax credit, the time is now.  Several federal energy tax credits originally slated to end in 2010 were extended through December 31, 2011.

Here's how the energy tax credits work:

You may claim a credit for 10% of the total cost of various home energy-efficiency products for your existing primary residence, including: insulation and biomass stoves.

For biomass stoves, the maximum combined credit is $300 (10% credit for the purchase of a 75% efficient biomass stove, insert or fireplace).

For other qualifying products, the maximum combined credit is $500 (10% percent of $5,000 in total cost) for all allowable products purchased between 2006 and 2011.

Tax advantages are just one of many reasons to conserve energy. Besides helping to protect the environment and reduce your carbon footprint, you can also save a lot of money on home heating. According to the Department of Energy, you can reduce your heating and cooling bills about 10% per year by simply turning your thermostat back 10°-15° for eight hours. Supplementing you home heating with a wood or pellet stove can let you do this.

Other cost-saving ideas include:

Insulate your home. Up to 30% percent of heated or cooled air can be lost through leaks, so add weather stripping and caulking wherever air escapes.
 
Heating water is the third-largest home energy expense, after heating/air conditioning and electrical appliances, so try lowering your water heater temperature to 120º F or lower.

Install tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system to your fireplace to re-circulate warmed air; and always close the damper when not in use.

Bottom line: Take advantage of financial incentives available to make your home more energy efficient, now before the winter's chill.

Contact Custom Insulation Co. for more information on making your home more energy efficient.

Excerpts from Huffington Post




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